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JOIN WHICH? LEGAL

 

How to write a will

All advice contained within this section relates to England and Wales only.

There are several ways to write a will. You can write it yourself, instruct a solicitor or professional will writer or use an online will writing service. 

Make a will

It is best to take professional advice if your family set-up or financial assets are complicated. For example, you may need advice if you are married but have children by a previous marriage or relationship; there are disputes within your family; you wish to have a trust included in your will; you own a house abroad; or you need extensive tax advice.

If you've made a will, it's important to keep it up to date in order to take into account any changes in circumstances such as marriage, divorce or the birth or adoption of a child. Should you get married or enter into a civil partnership, then any will that you made prior to doing so is automatically revoked. Unless a new will is made, you would die intestate.

Divorce or dissolution of a civil partnership does not revoke your will, but any appointment of your former spouse/civil partner as executor would not take effect, nor would any assets gifted to him or her.

Which? Wills can help

Choose from three wills packages to fit your needs:

Self Service allows you to draft your will yourself using guidance notes.

Self Service & Legal Review allows you to draft your will and have it reviewed by one of our wills specialists.

Wills Premium allows you to draft your will and have it reviewed by one of our wills specialists, plus receive a bound copy of the finished document. It also includes one year of free will storage.

Useful links and documents